The Navajo Nation in Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado and Utah
"The Long Walk-Carleton’s plan to make the Indians into instant agriculturalists appeared at first to be succeeding. By summer of 1864 they had nearly 3000 acres of land under cultivation with corn and wheat. But suddenly an infestation of cutworm destroyed most of the corn crop, and at the same time the wheat was destroyed by a series of severe storms. Again rations for the Indians had to be cut to twelve ounces of breadstuffs and eight ounces of meat per day, to ward off the threat of famine. As Steck and others had predicted, it was a mistake to expect the Navajos and Apaches to live together peacefully. Friction between the two tribes continued to grow, compounded by the almost total lack of interest among the traditionally nomadic Mescaleros in learning the art of agriculture. Finally the resentment of the Apaches came to a head and 335 of them, virtually the entire tribe, left the reservation in November 1865 returning to their homelands in southern New Mexico."

Credit:
"The Navajo (DINE) History- Long before the theory of the 'land bridge from Asia to North America across the Bering Strait', Navajo elders told their own story about their own origin. The Navajo (DINE') creation is the story of their origin through a series of emergences through a series of different colored worlds.

Accounts vary as to the exact number and colors of the worlds, for example, black, then blue, then yellow, then glittering, all of which lead up to their final emergence in the present world.

Although raiders and plunderers since known to history, the Navajo cannot be designated a warring tribe, for however courageous they may be, their lack of political integrity has ever been an obstacle to military organization. They never have had a tribal chief, properly so called, while their many leading men could never command more than a small following."

Credit:

Beginning of the Navajo Nation
The first Navajo (Dine) Delgates


Navajo Code Talkers
The Navajo (Dine) Warriors World War II
Moving into the future  - Then and now
A Navajo man,
date unknown
A Navajo family by a tradition hogan,
date unknown
Navajo Code Talkers
Navajo family with a visitor to Tuba City Church of Christ